Course Descriptions

Britton Deerfield High School Course Descriptions (updated 12/2015)

English

English 9
English 9 is a required course for all ninth grade students. We will read and write memoirs study memoir and poetry; we will research and write a multigenre paper. We will read, watch, discuss, and write about Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. Grammar is integrated into other units, with the focus on improving student writing. Students are expected to read books of their choice both during class and at home.

English 10
English 10 is a required course for all tenth grade students. Semester one predominately focuses on the prominent writers of the 19th century. Also during this semester, students will review grammar, poetry and composition skills. During second semester, students will read novels by 20th century authors. This semester also concentrates on public speaking, punctuation, poetry and formal writing skills.

English 11
English 11 is a required course for all eleventh grade students. English 11 is designed to continue to build a solid foundation of knowledge, skills, and strategies that will be refined, applies and extends as students engage in more complex ideas, texts, and tasks. Students will add to the list of various genres of classic and contemporary narrative and information texts with a special focus on World Literature and ACT success.

Honors English 11
Honors English 11 is a college prep course. Students who plan to go to college and are looking for a challenge should take this course. Prerequisite: teacher approval. Please see Mrs. Wyman for additional information.

English 12
English 12 is a required course for twelfth grade students. We will read and write literacy memoirs, college and scholarship essays, arguments, and short stories. Grammar is integrated into other units, with the focus on improving student writing. Students are expected to read books of their choice both during class and at home. Over the course of the year, students will compile a Senior Portfolio. While there are required elements, the contents of the portfolio will reflect the individual student’s choices, interests, and growth over their high school career.

Honors English 12
Like Honors English 11, Honors English 12 is a college prep course. Students who plan to go to college and are looking for a challenge should take this course. Prerequisite: teacher approval. In addition, there is some possibility that this class will turn in to an AP class. Please see Ms. Gedeon for additional information.

Desktop Publishing (9-12)
Desktop Publishing focuses on using computer software to format and combine text, numerical data, photographs, charts, and other visual graphic elements to produce publication-ready material. Depending on the nature of particular project, desktop publishers may write and edit text, create graphics to accompany text, convert photographs and drawings into digital images, design page layouts, create proposal, and develop presentations and advertising campaigns. Adobe InDesign and Photoshop will be the primary software used. Desktop Publishing students will be responsible for the design and creation of the school yearbook as well as other publications for the school and community.

Communication (10-12)
The English elective will focus on the media and entertainment choices that bombard our everyday lives. We will explore various forms of media (movies, music, television, social media, etc.) through five key questions on how media impacts our lives. We will move beyond being entertained by media to analyzing and critiquing its messages and purposes. These skills will be developed through regular class discussion, group work, projects, presentations, and essay writing. Students in this class must be ready to think. Warning: This course has been known to change the way you listen to music and watch movies—enter at your own risk.

Reading/Writing Workshop (9-12)
Reading and Writing Workshop is an elective open to all students grades 9 – 12. This is a flexible class, open to students who are looking for a challenge, students who need to make up a credit, and everyone in between. A reading and writing intensive course, students should expect to make choices about what they want to learn. Units offered may vary from student to student and semester to semester. Please see Ms. Gedeon for additional information. Prerequisites: none.

Mathematics

Algebra 1 (8 or 9)
Algebra 1 is designed to complete a full credit of Algebra 1 in a single school year. Algebra 1 will include a review of operations with rational and real numbers and a focus on linear relationships based on data. Investigations will include an emphasis on the algebraic manipulation of linear expressions, equations, and inequalities; on systems of linear equations; and representing linear equations, including graphing, transformations, and modeling. Algebra 1 will also include the exploration of operations applied to exponential expressions and polynomials. Problems solving skills play a major role in the course.

Geometry (9 or 10)
Students will take an inductive, interactive approach to learning geometric concepts. Students will use construction techniques graphing models to reinforce concepts taught in class. Student will be expected to derive definitions through a combination of inductive reasoning and hands on activities. This course covers the required concepts of Euclidean geometry including definitions, postulates, and theorems. Areas of study include angles, parallel lines, congruent and similar triangles, polygons, circles and arc, and the Pythagorean Theorem. Special topics covered include coordinate and spatial geometry, introductory trigonometry, and constructions. In addition to including problems that serve to review algebra, the process of “proving” theorems in introduced.

Algebra 2 (10 or 11)
This course is designed to provide the required Algebra 2 credit over two semesters. Students will learn to use graphing handheld technology to aid their understanding of the material.

Pre-Calculus (11-12)
This two-semester course is intended for students who plan to continue their mathematics education in college by enrollment in engineering, sciences, or math education programs. Students will use graphing handheld technology to aid their understanding of the materials.

Senior Math (12)
The first semester of Senior Math will include topics such as balancing a checkbook, financing a car, decorating a room, estimating costs, and making a budget. The second semester will focus on preparing seniors for college entrance exams and the Compass test. The material will be Algebra based.

Statistics (11-12)
This one semester course I intended as a senior elective math credit. Students will review the basics of statistics. Students will use handheld technology to assist their understanding and ability to work and interpret data and data distributions.

Trigonometry (11-12)
This one semester course is intended as a senior math credit. Students will review concepts taught in geometry and move on through more complex concepts. Students will use graphing handheld technology to aid their understanding of the materials.

Science

Earth Science (9)
This two-semester class begins with a section of the nature and practice of scientific inquiry. Then an overview of the four Earth Systems (geosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere) and the movement of elements, compounds, and energy with/between these systems are examined. This is followed by a detailed understanding of each system mentioned above. Finally, we discuss the position of the Earth in the universe and its evolution over time. Topics of study will include: Scientific Reasoning and Communication Skills, Earth Systems, Solid Earth, Fluid Earth and the Earth in Space and Time.

Biology (10)
This is a two-semester, laboratory course devoted to the study of the major themes and concepts that explain life processes. During the first semester, the focus is on microbiology and biochemistry. The major themes/standards include: cell biology, genetics, investigation, and experimentation. The content is primarily descriptive, but includes some concepts that require the application of basic mathematical skills. During the second semester, the focus is on macro biology. The major themes/standards include: classification, invertebrate/vertebrate physiology, and ecology. The laboratory exercises consist of topics supplementing lectures/discussions and are designed to lead the student into independent and/or team thought. Animal dissection lab exercises will constitute a majority of second semester coursework.

Chemistry (11-12)
This introductory course will study matter, the ways in which matter changes, and the ways in which energy is involved in these changes. Fundamental concepts of atomic theory, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, inorganic chemistry, acid-base chemistry, thermochemistry, and kinetics are covered as they relate to chemical knowledge. The emphasis is on problem solving in the lab-based course.

Physics (11-12)
This is an advanced math-based class designed for students interested in the health and engineering fields. The course is designed for students to collect data during labs/experiments and reflect on how the physical principles allow for an understanding in other sciences and everyday experiences. The relationships can be represented by mathematical statements, graphs, and maps. Topics of study will include: Scientific Reasoning and Communication Skills, Motion of Objects, Forces and Motion, Forms of Energy, and Energy Transformations. Enrollment in this course is per guidance counselor and or teacher recommendation.

Anatomy (11-12)
Students that take anatomy follow a curriculum that begins with basic cell anatomy and works its way up to different organ systems like the muscular system. Students investigate the structure and function of the human body. Topics covered include; basic organization of the body, biochemical composition, and major body systems along with the impact of diseases on certain systems. A background in Biology is strongly encouraged.

Applied Chemistry (11-12)
This introductory course will study matter, the ways in which matter changes, and the ways in which energy is involved in these changes. Fundamental concepts of atomic theory, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, inorganic chemistry, and kinetics are covered as they relate to chemical knowledge. The emphasis is on problem solving in the lab-based course, while working on the fundamentals of chemistry. Applied chemistry spends less time on math, while still covering a wide variety of chemistry essentials.

Principles of Engineering (9-12)
Students that take Principles of Engineering will follow a nation-wide curriculum that introduces students to a wide range of engineering topics. Students will develop skills in problem solving, research, and design while learning strategies for design process documentation, collaboration, and presentation. Students will learn the basics of mechanical engineering, energy sources, material testing, bridge design, and computer programming. A background in Algebra and Geometry is strongly encouraged.

Principles of Biomedical Sciences (10-12)
Students explore concepts of biology and medicine to determine factors that led to the death of a fictional person. While investigating the case, students examine autopsy reports, investigate medical history, and explore medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life. The activities and projects introduce students to human physiology, basic biology, medicine, and research processes while allowing them to design their own experiments to solve problems. A background in Biology is strongly encouraged.

Social Studies

World History and Geography (9)
World History explores the key events and global historical developments that have shaped the world we live in today. The course will address aspects around factors like economics, science, culture, religion, philosophy, politics & law, military conflict, literature and the arts. Students will uncover patterns of behavior, identify historical trends and themes, and explore historical movements and concepts. Students will refine their ability to read for comprehension and critical analysis; summarize, categorize, compare, and evaluate information; write clearly and convincingly; express facts and opinions orally; and use technology appropriately to present information.

U.S. History and Geography (10)
This course examines the major turning points in American history beginning with the events leading up to the Reconstruction and then focusing on the impact of the frontier, the changing nature of business and government, World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, the growth of the United States as a world power, the Cold War and the struggle to achieve class, ethnic, racial and gender equality. The course extends to the modern day. It will be expected that students will take an active part in strengthening their critical thinking, speaking, writing and researching skills.

Economics (11)
Understanding economics is becoming essential for citizens in our national and increasingly interconnected world economy. Students will understand how economies function and how to apply the concepts and principles of economics to their lives as individuals and as citizens. Understanding and applying these concepts and principles should help students make sense of daily events and enable them to analyze and develop reasoned thinking about economic challenges and public policies.

Civics (11)
The course is about government, and more particularly, about government I the United States. Throughout the year we shall consider the ways in which government in this country is organized, the ways in which it is controlled by the people, the many things that it does, and the various ways in which it does things. A special emphasis is placed on current events. Students are expected throughout the year to research, discuss, debate, interview, survey, and complete position papers and projects.

Sociology (11-12)
This course will offer students a unique and engaging exploration of social life, including all forms of social interaction and relationships. Students will learn concepts, theories and research methods that will enable them to understand and appreciate their lives and the larger social world. This course will provide a framework for exploring society and its influence on human groups (but not limited to) issues of race, gender and class. Students can also expect particular emphasis on the study of sport as a cultural phenomenon to better understand and explore social issues.

College Prep Planning (1st Semester) (12)
This course will be offered to seniors on the effects of the college application process and career planning options. BDHS is partnering with the Michigan Department of Education (MDE) and Michigan College Access Network (MCAN)

Debate and Speech (2nd Semester) (12)
This class is a practical course designed to offer the beginner speaker a number of opportunities to organize and prepare public speaking assignments. Students will be expected to speak and debate in front of an audience individually and as a team. Students will learn about the role of communication in our lives, the communication model, delivery styles, and the effectiveness of language, gestures, and organization techniques. Reading and writing assignments are required.

History through Film and Literature (9-12)
An advanced analysis of United States History through various approaches aimed at enhancing the historical perspective of culture and society. The literature and film would include classic and contemporary works of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction through which students explore, analyze, and interpret societal issues and conflicts.

Global Studies (10-12)
In this course we will use a variety of sources to look at the problems that the world is facing. Emphasis will be placed on the historical significance of the problems, the current issues, and proposed ways to solve them. Students will be challenged to think speak and write critically and persuasively.

Foreign Language

Spanish 1 (9-12)
Spanish 1 is an introduction to the Hispanic language and culture. This primary focus is to gain fluency in highly predictable situation such as conversations about hobbies, foods, schoolwork, etc. Students can expect to memorize large lists of vocabulary words and to learn some basics of Spanish grammar. The Hispanic culture is introduced through small readings and supplemental materials. The text is additionally supplemented with movies, audio recordings, computer software, and online resources.

Spanish 2 (9-12)
Spanish 2 picks up where Spanish 1 left off. We begin with a review the basics learned in Spanish 1. Then students will continue to explore new areas of vocabulary and learn new grammar concepts such as talking about past events, and expressing feeling and opinions on a variety of topics. Oral and written proficiency also take on additional importance in this course. Additional instruction regarding Hispanic countries and people are given through supplemental materials such as: movies, games, audio recordings, computer software, and online resources.

Spanish 3 (11-12)
Spanish 3 picks up where Spanish 2 left off. We begin with a review the basics learned in Spanish 2. Then students will continue to explore new areas of vocabulary and learn new grammar concepts such as talking about past events, and expressing feeling and opinions on a variety of topics. Oral and written proficiency also take on additional importance in this course. Additional instruction regarding Hispanic countries and people are given through supplemental materials such as: movies, games, audio recordings, computer software, and online resources.

Visual/Applied/Performing Arts

Fine Art (9-12)
Students develop basic drawing skills through observation from real life. The first semester is focused on perspective, shading and color. Once basic skills are mastered students will develop their painting and sculpting skills as well. They will work in a variety of styles (realism, abstract, surrealism) and in a variety of media including pencil, paint, clay and charcoal. The goal is for each individual to discover their own artistic style and become more confident artists.

Advanced Fine Art (10-12)
Students that complete Fine Art and would like to continue building art skills can take this advanced course. Students will start with specific assignments and work toward independent projects. Pre-requisite: One year of Fine Art with a B or better grade.

Design (9-12)
Design is all around us every day, everywhere. This class will begin with a focus on learning the elements and principles of art and design through drawing, painting and sculptural assignments. Then students will begin to apply the design principles in real-world applications. They will study Architecture, Automotive design, Product and Package Design, Fashion & Accessory, Advertising, etc., and try their hand at them.

Sculpture (9-12)
Making sculpture requires thinking 3-dimensionally, from every angle, so that the viewer can move around the art for a different impression. Students will work from small scale to large scale, making art that is representational and abstract. A variety of media will be used, including clay, cardboard, wire, plaster, metal, found and recycled objects, fibers, possibly stone.

Photography (10-12)
The basics of black and white photography are covered, including how to use a 35 mm camera, develop film and print your own photos. The first semester emphasizes learning the processes of producing high quality work. The second semester focuses on getting creative with the medium. CAUTION: This class is much more than snapping a photo now and then. It does require written assignments and work outside of class. Sign up for this class only if you are dedicated to taking photos after school, are focused and self-motivated. Teacher/counselor permission needed for this class.

Advanced Placement Studio Art (10-12)
Advanced Placement is an International organization that requires students to develop a portfolio of college level caliber and then submit it for judging. Students can earn college credit based on the score their portfolio earns. Serious art students, either planning to pursue a career in the visual arts or just passionate about making art, will spend the first semester creating specific art works for their portfolio, then they delve in to a concentration of their own design. Emphasis will be placed on developing a strong artistic style, creating art with strong content, and honing technical skills. Students will choose one of 3 portfolio areas to concentrate in: Drawing, 2-D Design or 3-D Design. Students must be pre-approved by teacher for this class by April of the year prior to the class and course work will require summer assignments prior to the school year.

Band (9-12)
Students learn basic music skills such as music literacy (note reading, symbol identification, music vocabulary and terms), rhythm reading (how to count and identify beats), performance techniques (learning the specific requirements to play instrument), and how to prepare for a performance. These are the same skills learned at the elementary and middle school levels, but on a more advanced level. The High School Band plays an important role throughout the entire school year. Responsibilities include: marching at Varsity Football games, Fall Pops Concert, Holiday Concert, Basketball Pep Band, District Band Festival, Spring Concert, Holiday Concert, District Band Festival, Spring Concert, Memorial Day Parade, and graduation. It is generally assumed that band is a year-long commitment. Performances are given outside of class time.

Choir (9-12)
Choir is an ensemble (group) experience. Students will learn and practice proper vocal technique, music reading skills, music theory, and musical interpretation. An emphasis will be placed on performance in a variety of musical styles. Participants will be expected to perform 5 or 6 times a year at after-school performances and/or out of town festival presentations. Competitive statewide performance opportunities are also available to choir members. Grades are based on rehearsal procedures, concert attendance, and demonstrated knowledge of musical concepts.

Drama (9-12)
This year-long course will explore the many facets of theatre art. Students will study and emulate several aspects of performance including: Movement, music exploration, dialogue delivery, public speaking, blocking, stage presence, and choreography. First semester will entail a performance in a play or musical and second semester will conclude with a dinner theatre performance. All performances are mandatory! No experience is necessary!

Physical Education/Health

Health (9)
This class is designed to help you understand the concepts of health and how to live a healthy lifestyle. It will give you the information you need to make good healthy choices during your lifetime. Evaluation will be based on class discussions, homework, tests, oral presentations, research projects and a cumulative exam at the end of the semester. One semester required course.

9th Grade Physical Education (9)
The physical education program for high school students is designed to develop the skills and attitudes necessary to achieve and maintain lifelong health and fitness. Students will be encouraged to gain an active appreciation of the positive role of physical fitness in overall health and well-being and to develop socially useful participation skills. In keeping with this philosophy, the program seeks to provide for the equal participation of all students through a variety of experiences leading to the development of positive self-concept, creativity, and enthusiasm for participation. Performances will be assessed by a regime of written, fitness, skills assessments as well as participation and attitude.

Advanced Physical Education (10-12) B or higher in 9th Grade PE
This course is designed to provide the students with the opportunity to develop strength, speed, and flexibility. Attempts will be made to develop an understanding of the major muscle group’s development, proper lifting, running techniques, stretching exercises, plyometrics and safety. We will focus on weight training, running, agility, muscular strength and endurance and conditioning of the body. Students will be introduced to the proper lifting techniques in the bench press, incline press, squat, jammer and deadlift. Students will use the Bigger Faster Stronger weight training program according to their sport/coach. We will be weight training four days a week, giving one day for recovery and working on speed, agility and cardiovascular fitness. Athletic coach referral is a requirement for this course.

Special Education

Resource Room (9-12)
The Britton Deerfield Resource Room program fulfills state and federal special education laws by providing services to qualifying students. Individual Education Plans (IEP) are developed to meet each student’s individual learning style and education needs. IEP team members include the student, parent/guardian, general education and special education teachers, support personnel, counselors and administrators.

Resource Room students with a current IEP may enroll in required and elective courses for high school credit with the special education department, but final classroom placements are determined by the IEP. Students may also get daily or frequent direct support for general education courses from the resource room teacher during the school day. They type and amount of Resource Room support is based on the student’s individual educational needs as defined in the IEP.

Resource Room teachers are in contact with general education teachers regarding progress of each student in general education courses. Feedback is provided to student from the Resource Room staff, as well as through their general education teachers.

Upperclassmen in the Resource Room program are exposed to career information and opportunities, along with education/vocational avenues leading toward their career goals. Transitional links to outside agencies and institutions of higher learning are made during the student’s junior and senior year.

MiCl Life Skills Program
The Life Skills Program at Britton Deerfield Schools is a specialized program set up to work with Secondary Mildly Cognitively Impaired Students in the areas of: Independent Living skills, Domestic Living skills, Employability skills, Community skills, Social skills, and Vocational skills. The goal of this program is to teach the skills necessary to live independently and to become successful in their personal life as well as their vocational life. The curriculum is designed to provide the instruction necessary for student to become contributing members of society and to have a positive quality of life.

Technology Education (9-12)
Technology Education is a program of instruction designed to assist all students in meeting State intermediate standards for technology. Technology education uses concepts of science, mathematics, social science, and language arts in a hands-on, systems based approach to problem solving that guides students in the understanding, design, and development of systems, devices and products to serve human needs and wants.

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